Paul Ryan preps bold corporate tax plan [Boston Herald]

While almost everyone agrees that the current U.S. system for taxing foreign proäts of American corporations is counterproductive, there has been heated partisan debate about what should be done. Now, with Republican dominance of Congress and the White House, we should look carefully at House Speaker Paul Ryan’s path-breaking plan for corporate tax reform.

Under current law, foreign proäts of American corporations are legally subject to a 35 percent U.S. tax — the highest corporate tax rate among industrialized countries. In fact, American corporations do not pay this tax unless and until they bring these foreign proäts back to the U.S.

Thus, the current system mainly beneäts tax lawyers and accountants.

Read the rest at bostonherald.com

How to increase retirement savings of 60 million employees [Pensions & Investments]

Senate Republicans are voting to repeal the Labor Department’s recent rules that would have expressly allowed states and cities to sponsor a type of individual retirement account, called an automatic IRA. These votes will rescind those rules, because they already have been rejected by House Republicans and the administration supports rescinding them.

While Republicans objected to a patchwork of state-sponsored retirement plans, Congress should promptly pass a federal automatic IRA invested by the private sector. This vehicle, developed by conservatives, is the most feasible way of substantially increasing retirement savings in the U.S.

About a third of all Americans have no retirement savings, and most don’t have enough to retire comfortably. The main reason: More than 60 million American employees have no retirement plan offered to them by an employer.

Read the rest at pionline.com…

Even with Hard Brexit, UK Asset Managers Can Still Serve the EU [RealClear Markets]

UK firms manage approximately L1 trillion in assets for European investors outside of the UK. With the Brexit negotiations slated to start this month, the UK Investment Association has raised serious questions about whether those assets could be taken away from UK asset managers – especially given Prime Minister May’s prioritization of immigration limits over capital markets.

However, even if the UK does not obtain preferential access to the EU’s capital markets in the Brexit negotiations, UK firms can continue to manage assets for EU clients, just like other non-EU firms including many US money managers.  The two key strategies employed by non-EU asset managers have been: indirect passporting and regulatory equivalence.

Read the rest at realclearmarkets.com…

These changes to quarterly reports would benefit companies and investors [MarketWatch]

Jay Clayton, the newly nominated chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission, is slated to appear before the Senate Banking Committee on March 23 to begin his confirmation process. He should resist the rising clamor to stop quarterly reporting by U.S. companies, despite the efforts by some politicians and investment professionals.

Critics of quarterly reporting argue that it unduly focuses corporate executives on maximizing profits over the short term — usually defined as the next three months. Instead, these critics argue that shifting to semi-annual reporting would lead corporate executives to make longer-term business investments — usually defined as three to five years.

These arguments are not supported by our empirical study of the most relevant “natural experiment” — when, in 2007, the U.K. requirement moved to quarterly from semi-annual reports. Our study found that shifting the frequency of reporting by U.K. companies did not have any statistically significant impact on their business investments.

Read the rest at marketwatch.com…

Opinion: Trump’s tax reform looks like just another of his many tweets [MarketWatch]

Although Donald Trump claims that his forthcoming tax plan will be “phenomenal,” he is in truth not likely to propose something really new.

Before the election, Trump put forth a broad tax plan and then a narrower plan.  But even the narrower plan created a budget deficit of roughly $3 trillion to $4 trillion over 10 years, according to the dynamic scoring of the independent researcher Tax Foundation.  That steep increase in the national debt would present major challenges, given rising interest rates and much larger budget pressures from entitlement programs.

Soon after the election, President Trump lambasted the border adjustment tax ( BAT ) plan of the House Republicans. Then he began to be more favorable to the BAT because he believed — wrongly — that it would impose a large tariff on Mexican imports to pay for the wall.  In fact, the BAT would effectively impose a tax on all imports, which would probably be absorbed by importing companies and their customers.

So there are three main questions about what type of tax plan Trump could propose.

Read the rest at marketwatch.com…

What will happen to Dodd-Frank under Trump’s executive order? [Brookings Institution]

On Friday, February 3, President Trump issued an executive order directing the Secretary of Treasury to report, within 120 days, on whether governmental rules and policies promote or inhibit the order’s Core Principles for Financial Regulation. These generally stated Principles stress investor choice, economic growth and international competition as well as the more traditional goals of financial regulation such as preventing bailouts, analyzing risk and increasing accountability.

Although the executive order did not mention Dodd-Frank by name, President Trump made clear: “We expect to be cutting a lot of Dodd-Frank, because frankly, I have so many people, friends of mine that had nice businesses, they can’t borrow money.” By contrast, the Federal Reserve data show that total loans and leases by banks grew by almost 7% per year during the last three years.

Paul Ryan preps bold corporate tax plan [Boston Herald]

While almost everyone agrees that the current U.S. system for taxing foreign profits of American corporations is counterproductive, there has been heated partisan debate about what should be done. Now, with Republican dominance of Congress and the White House, we should look carefully at House Speaker Paul Ryan’s path-breaking plan for corporate tax reform

Under current law, foreign profits of American corporations are legally subject to a 35 percent U.S. tax — the highest corporate tax rate among industrialized countries. In fact, American corporations do not pay this tax unless and until they bring these foreign profits back to the U.S.

Thus, the current system mainly benefits tax lawyers and accountants.

U.S. companies hold abroad approximately $2.5 trillion in past foreign profits. The U.S. Treasury collects little revenue from foreign profits, and U.S. corporations are discouraged from investing those profits back in this country.

Read the rest at bostonherald.com…

Trump’s tax: one budget buster and one revenue raiser [Financial Times]

Donald Trump’s campaign to become the next president of the U.S. has thrown up two far-reaching proposals to reform the taxation of corporate profits: reducing the tax rate on domestic profits to 15 per cent, and taxing foreign profits of U.S. corporations at 15 per cent each year.

The first proposal, a budget buster, is a poorly designed way to tax business; the second proposal, a revenue raiser, is a reasonable way to fix the current system for taxing foreign profits.

The current tax rate of 35 per cent is almost the highest in the world, so it should be lowered to make the U.S. a more competitive location for corporate facilities and jobs.

Read the rest at brookings.edu…